Hardware

Hardware Resources

The Srivastava Senior Design Lab has a wide variety of hardware available for use in projects, including microcontrollers, DSP boards, LINX RF transmitters and receivers, GPS units, webcams and more. These things can all be checked out from you TA for use on your project. See below for more details, and check out the links above.

Development Boards

Intel Galileo Development Boards

The lab has 25 Intel Galileo Development Boards available for checkout. The following links are useful resources for working with these boards:

Microcontrollers

PIC Microcontrollers

The lab has a number of PIC16F877A microcontrollers available for use in projects. It is understandable that wiring errors might happen, so each student is allowed to burn out a maximum of two PICs. They are programmed in a simplified C instruction set and are used to simplify design and perform IO with ease. Check the PIC Tutorial for more information.

BASIC Stamp Microcontrollers

The BASIC Stamp is a simple, tiny microcontroller with serial communications abilities, programmed in BASIC. This makes it ideal for simple applications where I/O speed is not critical, and the complexity of the HC12 is not needed.

DSPs

TI TMS320C54x DSPs

We have several C54x DSPs available for checkout (if demand is high, sharing a DSP with another group may be needed). Check out these resources for more information:

TI TMS320C6713 DSP

We have one TMS320C6713 (16 Mb) Floating Point DSP that was graciously donated by TI. The board is in the TA cabinet and is available for checkout.

LINX RF modules

We have a number of LINX transmitters and receivers available in the lab for RF projects, with a choice of the LC Series (315 or 418 MHz) or the HP series (902-928 MHz band).

GPS kits

We have 2-3 Garmin 12 XL GPS receivers. The Garmin units are equipped with a serial communication port and can be interfaced with microcontrollers or computers to provide information on position (lat, long, altitude, time) and velocity (differentiation of position). We also have one equivalent Motorola kit, and another kit by Ashtech (Eval and development kit, 990285). There are antennas on the roof of EL with wires into the lab so that data can be acquired while in the building (for testing purposes). The antennas can be accessed through connectors in the back left corner of the lab, by the far computer.

Filtered Back – Projection Optical Demonstration

Tori Fujinami, Xingchen Hong, Jacob Ramsey

Filtered Back – Projection Optical Demonstration

Featured Project

Project Description

Computed Tomography, often referred to as CT or CAT scans, is a modern technology used for medical imaging. While many people know of this technology, not many people understand how it works. The concepts behind CT scans are theoretical and often hard to visualize. Professor Carney has indicated that a small-scale device for demonstrational purposes will help students gain a more concrete understanding of the technical components behind this device. Using light rather than x-rays, we will design and build a simplified CT device for use as an educational tool.

Design Methodology

We will build a device with three components: a light source, a screen, and a stand to hold the object. After placing an object on the stand and starting the scan, the device will record three projections by rotating either the camera and screen or object. Using the three projections in tandem with an algorithm developed with a graduate student, our device will create a 3D reconstruction of the object.

Hardware

• Motors to rotate camera and screen or object

• Grid of photo sensors built into screen

• Light source

• Power source for each of these components

• Control system for timing between movement, light on, and sensor readings