Safety

ECE 445 Safety Guidelines

  1. No one is allowed to work in the lab alone. At least 2 people must be in the lab at all times.
  2. Everyone must complete a mandatory online safety training in order to be allowed to work in the lab. Certificates of completion must submitted on Compass2g.
  3. Any group planning on working with high voltages is required to complete additional safety training.
  4. Any group charging or utilizing certain battery chemistries must read, understand, and follow guidelines for safe battery usage.
  5. If you're working on any project involving electric current running through a human subject, you must read through and understand these guidelines for Safe Current Limits!

Requirements and Grading

The Laboratory Safety Training must be completed by all students enrolled in ECE 445. This module can be found on University's Division of Research Safety website.

Submission and Deadlines

Certificates of completion must submitted on Compass2g the due date listed on the Course Calendar. Students who have not completed this requirement will have lab access revoked.

Low Cost Myoelectric Prosthetic Hand

Michael Fatina, Jonathan Pan-Doh, Edward Wu

Low Cost Myoelectric Prosthetic Hand

Featured Project

According to the WHO, 80% of amputees are in developing nations, and less than 3% of that 80% have access to rehabilitative care. In a study by Heidi Witteveen, “the lack of sensory feedback was indicated as one of the major factors of prosthesis abandonment.” A low cost myoelectric prosthetic hand interfaced with a sensory substitution system returns functionality, increases the availability to amputees, and provides users with sensory feedback.

We will work with Aadeel Akhtar to develop a new iteration of his open source, low cost, myoelectric prosthetic hand. The current revision uses eight EMG channels, with sensors placed on the residual limb. A microcontroller communicates with an ADC, runs a classifier to determine the user’s type of grip, and controls motors in the hand achieving desired grips at predetermined velocities.

As requested by Aadeel, the socket and hand will operate independently using separate microcontrollers and interface with each other, providing modularity and customizability. The microcontroller in the socket will interface with the ADC and run the grip classifier, which will be expanded so finger velocities correspond to the amplitude of the user’s muscle activity. The hand microcontroller controls the motors and receives grip and velocity commands. Contact reflexes will be added via pressure sensors in fingertips, adjusting grip strength and velocity. The hand microcontroller will interface with existing sensory substitution systems using the pressure sensors. A PCB with a custom motor controller will fit inside the palm of the hand, and interface with the hand microcontroller.

Project Videos