Entrepreneurial Resources

Ingenuity Article on ECE

"If you have a dream, it's better to try and start a company and fail than to not try at all," said Whoola's founder Iyer, who is currently working with venture capitalists to hire a seasoned management team to help oversee his company's growth. Iyer appreciates the university's efforts to incubate start-up companies. "Some of the greatest companies got started in a garage," Iyer said. "This university is providing a five-star garage," he added, referring to the TCL, "so anybody who does not think the U of I is doing enough should maybe not be an entrepreneur."

MRM's Peck believes the timing is right for more entrepreneurs to enter the arena. "Students interested in pursuing this kind of a route are going to see tremendous resources begin to come into place over the next few years both on and off campus," predicted Peck.

Design Competitions

Available Grants

1) Leung Fund

Eligibility: ECE Students, individually or in teams of up to 4 students, at least one being in ECE, may apply for funds up to a maximum of $2,000 for use in accomplishing projects beyond normal classroom activities. These projects may be done as part of a normal class, but should in some way be extraordinary for that class. Projects may also be part of an individual study supervised by a faculty member or may be done within the context of a student organization.

Use of funds: Funds may be used for material costs, services (e.g. machine shop time), and, in special circumstances, travel.

Application materials: Students should submit: 

1. An abstract describing the project in 200-400 words.

2. An itemized budget and accompanying budget justification.

3. A list of deliverables. A final report should always be included in this list.

4. A timeline.

5. An outlook for plans beyond the project and long term impact.

Application process: Materials should be emailed to leungfund@illinois.edu with the subject line "Leung Student Venture Fund." Applications should be received by the end of the fourth week of the semester for full consideration, but will be reviewed on an ad hoc basis after that and funded contingent on remaining budget.

Dispersal of funds: Students should obtain supplies through the ECE Store whenever possible. Otherwise, reimbursements will be handled in the ECE Business Office. Orders and receipts should be consistent with the approved budget and will be reviewed. Major changes in budget should be approved by the review committee. Small adjustments in price or specific component choice do not require additional approval.

 

2) NCIIA

Advanced E-Team Grants
Grants range from $1,000 to $20,000 and may be used for further development and plans for commercialization of their ideas. Funding can be used for project expenses, legal fees, or student internships. These grants will be renewable for up to three years in declining amounts.

3) OSBI

As the consulting arm of the Illinois MBA program, OSBI finds solutions for companies as big Procter & Gamble or as small as technology startups here at the University of Illinois. OSBI conducts 30-40 projects at one time. Clients include General Electric, Dow AgroSciences, Lucent Technologies, Mayo Medical Ventures, and many technology start-ups and commercialization efforts.

If you have an interest in developing your projects further, please use their Contact page to request further information.

Intellectual Property

In the Intellectual Property world, there are four distinct types of safeguards for your ideas: Patents, Copyrights, Trade Secrets, and Trademarks.

  1. PATENTS: A patent is a license by the government that permits its owner to exclude members of the public from making, using, or selling the claimed invention.

    Important things to remember about patents:
    • To receive a patent, the invention must be useful, novel, and unobvious.
    • Disclosure: When an invention is publicly disclosed, inventors have one year to file a patent. Public disclosure means that the invention was seen in a public setting or similarly accessible to the public.
    • Cost: A patent application process will cost anywhere from $2000 - $10,000, and protection lasts from 14 to 20 years.
    • Laboratory notebooks are VERY important.
    • A provisional patent application (PPA) is a low-cost way of delaying the filing of a full patent application for one year. The filing fee is $75 - $150.
    • Priority goes to the first to invent, not the first to file.
    A presentation by Joe Barich on Patent Engineering and intellectual property is available for your perusal.
    Disclaimer: This presentation does not constitute legal advice. This presentation does not create an attorney-client relationship. This presentation was accurate as of the date it was originally given, but may become inaccurate due to changes in the underlying legal framework.
     
  2. COPYRIGHTS: A copyright covers only the expression of a work and does not do anything to stop people from approaching clever ideas that happened to be embodied in that work. A Copyright extends to software, meaning no one can copy it. No registration is mandatory, though registration could make for stronger claims later in case of infringement. Competitors could still look at software and come close to it without actually copying it. However, with a patent on the full invention, including the software, competitors are forbidden to design something like it.
     
  3. TRADE SECRETS: A trade secret is a duty to keep an invention secret, thus protecting it until a patent is issued or an invention is publicly disclosed. It is possible that this protection can be lost if secrets are not protected.
     
  4. TRADEMARKS: A trademark is either a word, phrase, symbol, or design that identifies and distinguishes the source of the goods or services of one party from those of others.

Here is the official Illinois Policy Concerning Ownership of Intellectual Property Created by Students as Class Work.

Here is a list of Web Resources maintained by the OTM for the University's Patent Office. For more specific instructions, see the following section.

Invention or Software Copyright Disclosures

Here are instructions for dealing with invention disclosures or software copyright disclosures, should the need arise:

  1. Go to the OTM (Office of Technology Management) Web site: http://www.otm.illinois.edu/
     
  2. Under the "For Campus" tab, there is the (1) Invention Disclosure Form, (2) Software Disclosure Form, and (3) Mobile App Disclosure Form. Complete and submit -- through the ECE Department -- the applicable Disclosure Form.
     
  3. The Invention Disclosure Form, under Section 14, contains the following statement:

    I (We) hereby agree to assign all right, title and interest to this invention to the UI and agree to execute all documents as requested, assigning to UI our rights in any patent application filed on this invention and to cooperate with the RTMO in the protection of this invention. UI will share any royalty income derived from the invention with the inventor(s) according to the General Rules, Article III, Section 8.

    Cross out/strike that paragraph -- and write in something like SEE ATTACHED LETTER -- and then add a letter that explains what you want from the University and why, giving as much detail as necessary for the OTM to check out the situation fully (i.e., that is not already covered by answering the questions in the Disclosure Form).
     
  4. After completing the Form, send it to the ECE Assistant to the Department Head in the Business Office (2120 ECEB). The form will be forwarded to OTM with a cover letter. OTM will then assign the Disclosure to a Tech Manager who will follow up as needed and coordinate a response to the students involved.

Transferring Intellectual Property Rights

Some projects proposed by mentors external or internal to the University, may require that you transfer the rights to intellectual property developed as part of the project they propose. Whether you agree to transfer the rights or decide to undertake a different project is completely up to you, the student.

If you do decide to undertake the proposed project, you will need to sign over your rights using this pre-approved form.

Recovery-Monitoring Knee Brace

Dong Hyun Lee, Jong Yoon Lee, Dennis Ryu

Featured Project

Problem:

Thanks to modern technology, it is easy to encounter a wide variety of wearable fitness devices such as Fitbit and Apple Watch in the market. Such devices are designed for average consumers who wish to track their lifestyle by counting steps or measuring heartbeats. However, it is rare to find a product for the actual patients who require both the real-time monitoring of a wearable device and the hard protection of a brace.

Personally, one of our teammates ruptured his front knee ACL and received reconstruction surgery a few years ago. After ACL surgery, it is common to wear a knee brace for about two to three months for protection from outside impacts, fast recovery, and restriction of movement. For a patient who is situated in rehabilitation after surgery, knee protection is an imperative recovery stage, but is often overlooked. One cannot deny that such a brace is also cumbersome to put on in the first place.

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Solution:

Our group aims to make a wearable device for people who require a knee brace by adding a health monitoring system onto an existing knee brace. The fundamental purpose is to protect the knee, but by adding a monitoring system we want to provide data and a platform for both doctor and patients so they can easily check the current status/progress of the injury.

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Audience:

1) Average person with leg problems

2) Athletes with leg injuries

3) Elderly people with discomforts

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Equipment:

Temperature sensors : perhaps in the form of electrodes, they will be used to measure the temperature of the swelling of the knee, which will indicate if recovery is going smoothly.

Pressure sensors : they will be calibrated such that a certain threshold of force must be applied by the brace to the leg. A snug fit is required for the brace to fulfill its job.

EMG circuit : we plan on constructing an EMG circuit based on op-amps, resistors, and capacitors. This will be the circuit that is intended for doctors, as it will detect muscle movement.

Development board: our main board will transmit the data from each of the sensors to a mobile interface via. Bluetooth. The user will be notified when the pressure sensors are not tight enough. For our purposes, the battery on the development will suffice, and we will not need additional dry cells.

The data will be transmitted to a mobile system, where it would also remind the user to wear the brace if taken off. To make sure the brace has a secure enough fit, pressure sensors will be calibrated to determine accordingly. We want to emphasize the hardware circuits that will be supplemented onto the leg brace.

We want to emphasize on the hardware circuit portion this brace contains. We have tested the temperature and pressure resistors on a breadboard by soldering them to resistors, and confirmed they work as intended by checking with a multimeter.

Project Videos