Mock Presentation

Description

Like the mock design review and the mock demo, the mock presentation is an informal, mandatory event designed to better prepare you for your Final Presentation. These sessions are run by staff and students from the Department of Communication, who are experts in teaching professional communication skills. In this session, you are only given five minutes to present a few slides on one major component of your project. Your presentation should include at least one block diagram, one graph/plot, and some math. You will also have the opportunity to see several other mock presentations. You will be given feedback based on the organization of the presentation, delivery and your ability to present as a team (so all members must speak).

Requirements and Grading

The mock presentation is meant to be a small subset of your final presentation. It is recommended that you choose some aspect of your project (like a major block from your block diagram) and present the design, requirements, and verification for that block. In order to get relevant feedback on your presentation skills, your mock presentation should also have an introduction (where the project is introduced) and a conclusion that wraps everything up. You will receive feedback on both your delivery, the format of your slides, and the organization of your presentation.

Your slides should generally include:

  1. Title slide: Names, group #, title.
  2. Introduction slide: What is the project?
  3. Objective slide: What problem does this solve?
  4. Design Slides: A few slides on design, requirements and verification (should include block diagram, math, graphs, figures, tables).
  5. Conclusion: Wrap things up, future work.

Mock presentation is graded credit/no credit based on attendance and apparent effort; showing up completely unprepared will earn no credit. An example mock presentation can be found here: example mock presentation

Submission and Deadlines

Sign-up is handled through PACE. Time slots are 1 hour long, and multiple groups will share a time slot. This will give you an opportunity to give and receive feedback from your peers. You will be required to stay until all groups have presented and received feedback.

LED Cube

Michael Lin, Raymond Yeh

LED Cube

Featured Project

LED technology is more advanced and much more efficient than traditional incandescent light bulbs and as such our team decided we wanted to build a device related to LEDs. An LED cube is inherently aesthetically pleasing and ours will be capable of displaying 3D animations and lighting patterns with much increased complexity compared to any 2D display of comparable resolution. Environmental interaction will also be able to control the various lighting effects on the cube. Although our plan is for a visually pleasing cube, our implementation can easily be adapted for more practical applications such as displaying 3D models.