Mock Presentation

Description

Like the mock design review and the mock demo, the mock presentation is an informal, mandatory event designed to better prepare you for your Final Presentation. These sessions are run by staff and students from the Department of Communication, who are experts in teaching professional communication skills. In this session, you are only given five minutes to present a few slides on one major component of your project. Your presentation should include at least one block diagram, one graph/plot, and some math. You will also have the opportunity to see several other mock presentations. You will be given feedback based on the organization of the presentation, delivery and your ability to present as a team (so all members must speak).

Requirements and Grading

The mock presentation is meant to be a small subset of your final presentation. It is recommended that you choose some aspect of your project (like a major block from your block diagram) and present the design, requirements, and verification for that block. In order to get relevant feedback on your presentation skills, your mock presentation should also have an introduction (where the project is introduced) and a conclusion that wraps everything up. You will receive feedback on both your delivery, the format of your slides, and the organization of your presentation.

Your slides should generally include:

  1. Title slide: Names, group #, title.
  2. Introduction slide: What is the project?
  3. Objective slide: What problem does this solve?
  4. Design Slides: A few slides on design, requirements and verification (should include block diagram, math, graphs, figures, tables).
  5. Conclusion: Wrap things up, future work.

Mock presentation is graded credit/no credit based on attendance and apparent effort; showing up completely unprepared will earn no credit. An example mock presentation can be found here: example mock presentation

Submission and Deadlines

Sign-up is handled through PACE. Time slots are 1 hour long, and multiple groups will share a time slot. This will give you an opportunity to give and receive feedback from your peers. You will be required to stay until all groups have presented and received feedback.

Prosthetic Control Board

Caleb Albers, Daniel Lee

Prosthetic Control Board

Featured Project

Psyonic is a local start-up that has been working on a prosthetic arm with an impressive set of features as well as being affordable. The current iteration of the main hand board is functional, but has limitations in computational power as well as scalability. In lieu of this, Psyonic wishes to switch to a production-ready chip that is an improvement on the current micro controller by utilizing a more modern architecture. During this change a few new features would be added that would improve safety, allow for easier debugging, and fix some issues present in the current implementation. The board is also slated to communicate with several other boards found in the hand. Additionally we are looking at the possibility of improving the longevity of the product with methods such as conformal coating and potting.

Core Functionality:

Replace microcontroller, change connectors, and code software to send control signals to the motor drivers

Tier 1 functions:

Add additional communication interfaces (I2C), and add temperature sensor.

Tier 2 functions:

Setup framework for communication between other boards, and improve board longevity.

Overview of proposed changes by affected area:

Microcontroller/Architecture Change:

Teensy -> Production-ready chip (most likely ARM based, i.e. STM32 family of processors)

Board:

support new microcontroller, adding additional communication interfaces (I2C), change to more robust connector. (will need to design pcb for both main control as well as finger sensors)

Sensor:

Addition of a temperature sensor to provide temperature feedback to the microcontroller.

Software:

change from Arduino IDE to new toolchain. (ARM has various base libraries such as mbed and can be configured for use with eclipse to act as IDE) Lay out framework to allow communication from other boards found in other parts of the arm.