Mock Presentation

Description

Like the mock design review and the mock demo, the mock presentation is an informal, mandatory event designed to better prepare you for your Final Presentation. These sessions are run by staff and students from the Department of Communication, who are experts in teaching professional communication skills. In this session, you are only given five minutes to present a few slides on one major component of your project. Your presentation should include at least one block diagram, one graph/plot, and some math. You will also have the opportunity to see several other mock presentations. You will be given feedback based on the organization of the presentation, delivery and your ability to present as a team (so all members must speak).

Requirements and Grading

The mock presentation is meant to be a small subset of your final presentation. It is recommended that you choose some aspect of your project (like a major block from your block diagram) and present the design, requirements, and verification for that block. In order to get relevant feedback on your presentation skills, your mock presentation should also have an introduction (where the project is introduced) and a conclusion that wraps everything up. You will receive feedback on both your delivery, the format of your slides, and the organization of your presentation.

Your slides should generally include:

  1. Title slide: Names, group #, title.
  2. Introduction slide: What is the project?
  3. Objective slide: What problem does this solve?
  4. Design Slides: A few slides on design, requirements and verification (should include block diagram, math, graphs, figures, tables).
  5. Conclusion: Wrap things up, future work.

Mock presentation is graded credit/no credit based on attendance and apparent effort; showing up completely unprepared will earn no credit. An example mock presentation can be found here: example mock presentation

Submission and Deadlines

Sign-up is handled through PACE. Time slots are 1 hour long, and multiple groups will share a time slot. This will give you an opportunity to give and receive feedback from your peers. You will be required to stay until all groups have presented and received feedback.

Propeller-less Multi-rotor

Ignacio Aguirre Panadero, Bree Peng, Leo Yamamae

Propeller-less Multi-rotor

Featured Project

Our project explored the every-expanding field of drones. We wanted to solve a problem with the dangers of plastic propellers as well as explore new method of propulsion for drones.

Our design uses a centrifugal fan design inspired by Samm Shepard's "This is NOT a Propeller" video where he created a centrifugal fan for a radio controlled plane. We were able to design a fan that has a peak output of 550g per fan that is safe when crashing and when the impeller inside damaged.

The chassis and fans are made of laser-cut polystyrene and is powered using brushless motors typically used for radio-controlled helicopters.

The drone uses an Arduino DUE with a custom shield and a PCB to control the system via Electronic Speed Controllers. The drone also has a feedback loop that will try to level the drone using a MPU6050.

We were able to prove that this method of drone propulsion is possible and is safer than using hard plastic propellers.

Project Videos