Project

# Title Team Members TA Documents Sponsor
48 Universal Automotive Wheel Alignment Sensor System
Isaac Kousari
Michael Danek
Luke Wendt design_document0.pdf
final_paper0.pdf
presentation0.pptx
proposal0.pdf
Every year, automotive manufacturers introduce new technologies into their vehicles that increase efficiency and provide meaningful data to facilitate the diagnosis of potential safety or performance issues. Modern vehicles can sense when routine maintenance – such as brake, oil, or tire replacement - is necessary. Despite these technological advances, sensor systems still lack the ability to tell a user when wheel alignment is needed. Among other issues, misaligned wheels cause vehicles to handle unpredictably and increase tire wear.
Currently, consumers can only check their cars’ wheel alignments by making an appointment with a professional and paying for an alignment, which can range anywhere from $50 to hundreds of dollars. Our goal is to develop an alignment-sensing system that can be mounted on any vehicle by an average consumer. Such a system will enable users to determine if their vehicle(s) need an alignment while saving them time and money.
To implement such a system, we will mount an accelerometer and wireless transmitter to each wheel of a car. The data collected will be transmitted to a central hub attached to the chassis, consisting of a microcontroller for data processing and three additional accelerometers used as reference points to determine the camber, caster, and toe of a vehicle. Once alignment data is collected, it will be cross-referenced with a database of OEM alignment specifications for each manufacturer. Until this system is integrated into existing car diagnostic systems, alignment information will be available to users via a smart phone application.
While alignment detection systems already exist, they only appear in race cars where all sensors are mounted to the vehicle chassis. This system would not be feasible for consumer cars because a large percentage of them have been in accidents, meaning that the chassis can be warped and give inaccurate readings.

S.I.P. (Smart Irrigation Project)

Jackson Lenz, James McMahon

S.I.P. (Smart Irrigation Project)

Featured Project

Jackson Lenz

James McMahon

Our project is to be a reliable, robust, and intelligent irrigation controller for use in areas where reliable weather prediction, water supply, and power supply are not found.

Upon completion of the project, our device will be able to determine the moisture level of the soil, the water level in a water tank, and the temperature, humidity, insolation, and barometric pressure of the environment. It will perform some processing on the observed environmental factors to determine if rain can be expected soon, Comparing this knowledge to the dampness of the soil and the amount of water in reserves will either trigger a command to begin irrigation or maintain a command to not irrigate the fields. This device will allow farmers to make much more efficient use of precious water and also avoid dehydrating crops to death.

In developing nations, power is also of concern because it is not as readily available as power here in the United States. For that reason, our device will incorporate several amp-hours of energy storage in the form of rechargeable, maintenance-free, lead acid batteries. These batteries will charge while power is available from the grid and discharge when power is no longer available. This will allow for uninterrupted control of irrigation. When power is available from the grid, our device will be powered by the grid. At other times, the batteries will supply the required power.

The project is titled S.I.P. because it will reduce water wasted and will be very power efficient (by extremely conservative estimates, able to run for 70 hours without input from the grid), thus sipping on both power and water.

We welcome all questions and comments regarding our project in its current form.

Thank you all very much for you time and consideration!