Project Proposal

Video Lecture

Video, Slides

Description

The proposal outlines your project's motivation, design, requirements, ethics, and safety. The project proposal is an expansion on the information provided in the RFA. Use the following format:

  1. Introduction

    • Objective: One to two paragraphs detailing the problem statement and proposed solution.
    • Background: One to two paragraphs explaining the context of the problem to be solved by your project, including any relevent references to justify the existence and/or importance of the problem (i.e., the need or want for a solution).
    • High-level requirements list: A list of at most three quantitative characteristics that this project must exhibit in order to solve the problem. Each high-levl requirement must be stated in complete sentences and displayed as a bulleted list.
  2. Design
    • Block Diagram: A general block diagram of the design of your solution. Each block should be as modular as possible. In other words, they can be implemented independently and re-assembled later. The block diagram should be accompanied by a brief (1 paragraph) description of the high level design justifying that the design will satisfy the high-level requirements.
    • Physical Design (if applicable): A physical diagram of the project indicating things such as mechanical dimensions or placement of sensors and actuators. The physical diagram should also be accompanied by a brief one paragraph description.
    • Functional Overview: A brief description of the function of each block in the block diagram and explain how each block contributes to the overall design and feature list above. Include a discussion of the interface with other blocks. Every block in the block diagram must have its own description and each description should be 1-2 paragraphs in length.
    • Block Requirements: Include requirements for each block in the block diagram (requirements only, verification will be added for the Design Document). Please see the R&V page for instructions on how to write requirements. Every block must have a minimum of one requirement.
    • Risk Analysis: Identify the block or interface that poses the greatest risk to successful completion of the project. Justify your choice.
  3. Ethics and Safety
    Assess the ethical and safety issues relevant to your project. Consider both issues arising during the development of your project and those which could arise from the accidental or intentional misuse of your project. Specific ethical issues should be discussed in the context of the IEEE and/or ACM Code of Ethics. Cite, but do not copy the Codes. Explain how you will avoid ethical breaches. Cite and discuss relevant safety and regulatory standards as they apply to your project. Review state and federal regulations, industry standards, and campus policy. Identify potential safety concerns in your project.

Requirements and Grading

Please see the Proposal Grading Rubric for grading details. Please see Example Proposal for reference. Note that this proposal is an excellent example of what is expected of a proposal that would receive an "A" grade.

Submission and Deadlines

The Project Proposal document should be uploaded to My Project on PACE in PDF format before the deadline listed on the Calendar.

Smart Frisbee

Ryan Moser, Blake Yerkes, James Younce

Smart Frisbee

Featured Project

The idea of this project would be to improve upon the 395 project ‘Smart Frisbee’ done by a group that included James Younce. The improvements would be to create a wristband with low power / short range RF capabilities that would be able to transmit a user ID to the frisbee, allowing the frisbee to know what player is holding it. Furthermore, the PCB from the 395 course would be used as a point of reference, but significantly redesigned in order to introduce the transceiver, a high accuracy GPS module, and any other parts that could be modified to decrease power consumption. The frisbee’s current sensors are a GPS module, and an MPU 6050, which houses an accelerometer and gyroscope.

The software of the system on the frisbee would be redesigned and optimized to record various statistics as well as improve gameplay tracking features for teams and individual players. These statistics could be player specific events such as the number of throws, number of catches, longest throw, fastest throw, most goals, etc.

The new hardware would improve the frisbee’s ability to properly moderate gameplay and improve “housekeeping”, such as ensuring that an interception by the other team in the end zone would not be counted as a score. Further improvements would be seen on the software side, as the frisbee in it’s current iteration will score as long as the frisbee was thrown over the endzone, and the only way to eliminate false goals is to press a button within a 10 second window after the goal.