Lab Notebook

Video Lecture

Video, Slides

Description

Keeping a professional lab notebook is a requirement of the course. If maintained properly, lab notebooks serve as an official and legal record of the development of the intellectual property related to your project. It also serves as a way to document and track changes to your design, results of all tests performed, and the effort you have put into your project. A well-kept notebook will simplify writing of all required documentation for this course (design review, final paper, etc) as all of the information in those documents should already exist in your notebook. Finally, keeping a notebook is simply good engineering practice and likely will be required by future employers, so it is a good idea to get in the habit of maintaining one now.

The Book: Any notebook with permanent bindings designed for laboratory record keeping is acceptable. Those with pre-numbered pages are required. Ideally, it should have graph rulings on alternate pages, or else quarter-inch square grid on all pages. We will not accept normal spiral-bound notebooks, as these are not permissible in court since pages can be easily replaced. While most of you probably won't be taking your design to court, we want to teach you to get into the habit of keeping legally acceptable records. Some of you may decide you do want to patent your project, so it will be very beneficial to have given yourself the legal advantage from the start.

We will allow you to keep your notebook on a computer, but entries will still need to be printed out and attached to a physical notebook for weekly meetings. Keep in mind also that it may be easier in the long run to scratch out rough graphs and equations on paper, so try to plan ahead. If you know you'll have a lot of graphs, equations, etc., don't make more work for yourself than you need to. Do NOT email your notebook entries to your TA unless he or she specifically requests that you do so.

Notebook entries: Each complete entry should include:

  1. Date
  2. Brief statement of objectives for that session
  3. Record of what was done

The record will include equations, diagrams, and figures. These should be numbered for reference in the narrative portion of the book. Written entries and equations should appear on the right-hand page of each pair. Drawn figures, diagrams, and photocopies extracted from published sources should be placed on the left-hand side, which is graph-ruled. All separate documents should be permanently attached to the notebook. All hand-written entries must be made in pen.

Overall, the book should contain a record that is clear and complete, so that someone else can follow progress, understand problems, and understand decisions that were made in designing and executing the project.

What to include:

There is always something to record:

Suppose you are only "kicking around" design ideas for the project with someone, or scanning library sources. Your objective is what you're hoping to find. The record shows what you found or what you decided and why, even if it isn't final.

One of the most common errors is to fail to record these seemingly "unimportant" activities. Down the road, they may prove crucial in understanding when and where a particular idea came from.

Requirements and Grading

Lab notebooks will be graded according to the lab notebook evaluation sheet at the end of the semester.

Submission and Deadlines

Lab notebooks must be submitted at lab checkout on Reading Day. If you are unable to attend lab checkout, please make arrangements with your TA ahead of time.

Drum Tutor Lite

Zhen Qin, Yuanheng Yan, Xun Yu

Drum Tutor Lite

Featured Project

Team: Yuanheng Yan, Zhen Qin, Xun Yu

Vision: Rhythm games such as guitar hero are much easier than playing the actual drums. We want to make a drum tutor that makes playing drums as easy as guitar hero. The player is not required to read a sheet music.

Description: We will build a drum add-on that will tutor people how to play the drums. We will make a panel for visual queue of the drum and beats in a form similar to guitar hero game. The panel can be a N*10 (N varying with the drum kit) led bar array. Each horizontal bar will be a beat and each horizontal line above the bottom line will represent the upcoming beats.

There will be sensors on each drum that will fire when the drum heads is hit. The drums will be affixed with ring of light that provides the timing and accuracy of the player according to the sensors.

Of course with a flip of a switch, the drum could be a simple light up drum: when the player hits the drum, that particular drum will light up giving cool effects.

The system will be on a microprocessor. Or for more versatile uses, it could be connected to the computer. And a app will be written for the tutor.

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