Individual Progress Report

Description

The Individual Progress Report (IPR) is a chance to put your contributions to the team's progress in writing. The report will discuss not only the components and subsystems you have personally been responsible for, but what components you have helped work on as well. It is important to talk about the relation between your work and your teammates' work as well.

Requirements and Grading

This report should be 5-12 pages of your own work. This means that you cannot take paragraphs/text from your Design Review document, since that was a collaborative effort. The IPR Grading Rubric describes what we look for in grading this assignment. The requirements are expanded on below:

  1. General: Concise writing is encouraged, but it is important that all pertinent information is conveyed. All figures should be labeled and formatted consistently.
  2. Formatting: Please refer to the Final Report Guidelines for general writing guidelines, since the format of this report should be very similar to that of the final report. Note that each component of the Final Report may be tailored to the parts of the project the individual has been active in.
  3. Introduction: First, discuss what portion of the system you have been active in designing connects to which portion of a different subsystem, and how these interact to complete an overall objective. Then discuss what you have accomplished, what you are currently working on, and what you still have left to do.
  4. Design: Discuss the design work you have done so far. It is expected that you have done calculations and/or found relevant equations, created circuits for your parts of the project, and simulated / drawn schematics for your parts. You may have already, at a high level, discussed how your part fits into the rest of the project, but you should expand on the technical details and interface between your module(s) and the other modules of the project.
  5. Verification: Testing and verification is also very important. Make sure you describe each test that was performed and its procedure in detail, and give quantitative, meaningful results. Also describe tests that have yet to be performed. We should be convinced that if all your tests will pass, your part of the project will work.
  6. Conclusion: Discuss a plan and timeline for completing your responsibilities and your project as a whole. Also explain the ethical considerations of your project by consulting the IEEE Code of Ethics, ACM Code of Ethics, or another relevant Code of Ethics.
  7. Citations: You need citations. Cite sources for equations, Application Notes you referenced in your design, and any literature you used to help design or verify your work. If you checked something from another course's lecture slides, Google'd for things related to your project, or anything similar, then you have something you need to cite. At the very least, since you have talked about the ethical considerations of your project as it relates to a published code of ethics (e.g., IEEE or ACM), you should cite those!

Submission and Deadlines

The IPR should be emailed to your TA in PDF format by the deadline listed on the Course Calendar.

Wireless IntraNetwork

Daniel Gardner, Jeeth Suresh

Wireless IntraNetwork

Featured Project

There is a drastic lack of networking infrastructure in unstable or remote areas, where businesses don’t think they can reliably recoup the large initial cost of construction. Our goal is to bring the internet to these areas. We will use a network of extremely affordable (<$20, made possible by IoT technology) solar-powered nodes that communicate via Wi-Fi with one another and personal devices, donated through organizations such as OLPC, creating an intranet. Each node covers an area approximately 600-800ft in every direction with 4MB/s access and 16GB of cached data, saving valuable bandwidth. Internal communication applications will be provided, minimizing expensive and slow global internet connections. Several solutions exist, but all have failed due to costs of over $200/node or the lack of networking capability.

To connect to the internet at large, a more powerful “server” may be added. This server hooks into the network like other nodes, but contains a cellular connection to connect to the global internet. Any device on the network will be able to access the web via the server’s connection, effectively spreading the cost of a single cellular data plan (which is too expensive for individuals in rural areas). The server also contains a continually-updated several-terabyte cache of educational data and programs, such as Wikipedia and Project Gutenberg. This data gives students and educators high-speed access to resources. Working in harmony, these two components foster economic growth and education, while significantly reducing the costs of adding future infrastructure.