Final Demo

Description

The Final Demonstration is the single most important measure of the success of your project. The evaluation is focused on issues of completion, testing, and reliable operation. You will demo your entire project to a team of one professor, your TA, and several peer reviewers. Other guests (e.g., alumni, high school students, donors) may, at times, also be present.

Requirements and Grading

Students must be able to demonstrate the full functionality of their project and any requirement in their Requirements and Verification table to the instructor. Credit will not be given for features which cannot be demonstrated. For tests that are lengthy or require equipment not available at the demo, students should have their lab notebooks ready to show testing data. For any portion of the project which does not function as specified, students should have hypotheses (and supporting evidence) of what is causing the problem.

The design team should be ready to justify design decisions and discuss any technical aspect of the project or its performance (not just one's own responsibilities). Quantitative results are expected wherever applicable. See the Demo Grading Rubric for specific details, but in general, show the following:

  1. Completion: The project has been entirely completed.
  2. Thoroughness: Care and attention to detail are evident in construction and layout.
  3. Performance: Performance is completely verified, and operation is reliable.
  4. Understanding: Everyone on the project team must must be able to demonstrate understanding of his/her technical work and show that all members have contributed significantly.
  5. Complexity: A multiplier will be applied to your score reflecting the complexity of the project. This multiplier is between 0.5 and 1.

Submission and Deadlines

Sign-up for a demo time is handled through the PACE system. Again, remember to sign up for a peer review, as well.

Cypress Robot Kit

Todd Nguyen, Byung Joo Park, Alvin Wu

Cypress Robot Kit

Featured Project

Cypress is looking to develop a robotic kit with the purpose of interesting the maker community in the PSOC and its potential. We will be developing a shield that will attach to a PSoC board that will interface to our motors and sensors. To make the shield, we will design our own PCB that will mount on the PSoC directly. The end product will be a remote controlled rover-like robot (through bluetooth) with sensors to achieve line following and obstacle avoidance.

The modules that we will implement:

- Motor Control: H-bridge and PWM control

- Bluetooth Control: Serial communication with PSoC BLE Module, and phone application

- Line Following System: IR sensors

- Obstacle Avoidance System: Ultrasonic sensor

Cypress wishes to use as many off-the-shelf products as possible in order to achieve a “kit-able” design for hobbyists. Building the robot will be a plug-and-play experience so that users can focus on exploring the capabilities of the PSoC.

Our robot will offer three modes which can be toggled through the app: a line following mode, an obstacle-avoiding mode, and a manual-control mode. In the manual-control mode, one will be able to control the motors with the app. In autonomous modes, the robot will be controlled based off of the input from the sensors.