Final Demo :: ECE 445 - Senior Design Laboratory

Final Demo

Description

The Final Demo is the single most important measure (and assignment) for the success of your project. The evaluation is holistic, focused on whether your project is completed, well-designed, reliable, and usable. You will demo your project to your professor, at least one TA, and a few peer reviewers. Other guests (e.g. alumni, high school students, sponsors, or other department affiliates) may also be present.

Requirements and Grading

Students must be able to demonstrate the full functionality of their project by proving that all the requirements in their Requirements and Verification (RV) table are met. Students must bring a printed out version of their block diagram, high level requirements, and RV table. Credit will not be given for feature which cannot be demonstrated.

For tests that are lengthy or require equipment not available at the time of demo, students should have their lab notebooks or printouts ready to show testing data. For any portion of the project which does not function as specified, students should have hypotehses (and supporting evidence) of what is causing the problem. If your demo needs to happen somewhere that is not the Senior Design Lab, you must communicate this with your TA!

The design team should be ready to justify design decisions and discuss any technical aspect of the project or its performance (not just one's own responsibilities). Quantitative results are expected wherever applicable. The demo grade depends on the following general areas: See the Demo Grading Rubric for specific details, but in general, show the following:

  1. Completion: The project has been entirely completed.
  2. Integration: The project is well-integrated, looking more like a final product than a prototype.
  3. Performance: Performance is completely verified, and operation is reliable.
  4. Understanding: Everyone on the project team must must be able to demonstrate understanding of his/her technical work and show that all members have contributed significantly.
  5. Polish & Attention to Detail: The project is well-polished with the user in mind. Good attention to detail is afforded to useability, presentation, and packaging.

 

Submission and Deadlines

Signing-up for a demo time is handled through the PACE system. Again, remember to sign up for a peer review as well.

VoxBox Robo-Drummer

Craig Bost, Nicholas Dulin, Drake Proffitt

VoxBox Robo-Drummer

Featured Project

Our group proposes to create robot drummer which would respond to human voice "beatboxing" input, via conventional dynamic microphone, and translate the input into the corresponding drum hit performance. For example, if the human user issues a bass-kick voice sound, the robot will recognize it and strike the bass drum; and likewise for the hi-hat/snare and clap. Our design will minimally cover 3 different drum hit types (bass hit, snare hit, clap hit), and respond with minimal latency.

This would involve amplifying the analog signal (as dynamic mics drive fairly low gain signals), which would be sampled by a dsPIC33F DSP/MCU (or comparable chipset), and processed for trigger event recognition. This entails applying Short-Time Fourier Transform analysis to provide spectral content data to our event detection algorithm (i.e. recognizing the "control" signal from the human user). The MCU functionality of the dsPIC33F would be used for relaying the trigger commands to the actuator circuits controlling the robot.

The robot in question would be small; about the size of ventriloquist dummy. The "drum set" would be scaled accordingly (think pots and pans, like a child would play with). Actuators would likely be based on solenoids, as opposed to motors.

Beyond these minimal capabilities, we would add analog prefiltering of the input audio signal, and amplification of the drum hits, as bonus features if the development and implementation process goes better than expected.

Project Videos