Design Review

Video Lecture

Video, Slides

Description

The design review is a 30-minute meeting intended to make sure that the team has a successful project. Students will present and defend their design while instructors and TAs critique it, identifying any infeasible or unsafe aspects and steering the team toward success. Instructors and TAs will ask questions throughout and may choose the order of blocks to be discussed. Prepare for the following sequence.
  1. Promptly project design document on projector.
  2. Introduce team members (name, major, and relevant interests).
  3. Present problem statement and proposed solution (<2 minutes)
  4. Present design overview (<3 minutes)
    1. High-level requirements
    2. Block diagram
    3. Physical design
  5. For the remainder of the review, you will participate in a detailed discussion of the design. Plan to cover each block, one at a time, beginning with the most critical. The course staff will ask questions and may step in to guide the discussion. Be prepared to discuss all aspects of your design with a focus on the following.
    1. Requirements
    2. Evidence that the design meets requirements (use the following as applicable)
      • Simulations
      • Calculations
      • Measurements
      • Schematics
      • Flowcharts
      • Mechanical drawings
      • Tolerance analysis

Submission and Deadlines

Your design document should be uploaded to PACE in PDF format by Midnight the Friday before design review. If you uploaded a mock DR document to PACE, please make sure that it has been removed before DR.

Smart Frisbee

Ryan Moser, Blake Yerkes, James Younce

Smart Frisbee

Featured Project

The idea of this project would be to improve upon the 395 project ‘Smart Frisbee’ done by a group that included James Younce. The improvements would be to create a wristband with low power / short range RF capabilities that would be able to transmit a user ID to the frisbee, allowing the frisbee to know what player is holding it. Furthermore, the PCB from the 395 course would be used as a point of reference, but significantly redesigned in order to introduce the transceiver, a high accuracy GPS module, and any other parts that could be modified to decrease power consumption. The frisbee’s current sensors are a GPS module, and an MPU 6050, which houses an accelerometer and gyroscope.

The software of the system on the frisbee would be redesigned and optimized to record various statistics as well as improve gameplay tracking features for teams and individual players. These statistics could be player specific events such as the number of throws, number of catches, longest throw, fastest throw, most goals, etc.

The new hardware would improve the frisbee’s ability to properly moderate gameplay and improve “housekeeping”, such as ensuring that an interception by the other team in the end zone would not be counted as a score. Further improvements would be seen on the software side, as the frisbee in it’s current iteration will score as long as the frisbee was thrown over the endzone, and the only way to eliminate false goals is to press a button within a 10 second window after the goal.