Project

# Title Team Members TA Documents Sponsor
11 Emergency Vitals Monitor
Brandon Noble
Songtao He
Zihong Zeng
Madison Hedlund design_document1.pdf
design_document2.pdf
design_document3.pdf
design_document4.pdf
final_paper1.pdf
proposal3.pdf
proposal1.pdf
Zihong Zeng, zihongz2, Songtao He, songtao2, Brandon Noble, bnoble2

Problem: Administering first aid in disaster situations is an extremely stressful task, that is prone to error if not done by a very well trained professional. Under circumstances with multiple injuries (gunshot, heat/fire related, earthquake, etc.), with limited bystanders available, treatment for these injuries are typically left for emergency response personnel.

Solution: A uniquely colored automated blood pressure cuff with extending rod for taking temperature, which doubles as the alignment for the pressure cuff's microphone. This simplifies the use as much as possible so that only a few people can attach them to as large a group as necessary in as little time needed. After activation, the blood pressure cuff will automatically take readings of blood pressure, heart rate, and temperature every thirty seconds. The blood pressure and heart rate can be used to determine an individual's 'shock index', which would set up a triage system automatically. This data is collated on a device for the user so as to see the ranking of each cuff in use in terms of who needs attention first, and gives first aid advice on how to treat the conditions detected.

Solution Components:

Subsystem1: Automated Blood Pressure Cuff - A modified digital blood pressure cuff. Uses modern blood pressure cuff with colored strip, and rod with IC temperature sensor at the tip. By extending it along the inside of the arm, it would also align the microphone used for the digital cuff, removing the need to ensure it is aligned by the user. Rapidly inflates pressure to 180 mmHg, drops off to room pressure, listening for Korotkoff sounds to determine systolic and diastolic blood pressure, as well as heart rate.

Subsystem2: IoT communication - For prototyping, we'll send information over wifi to be processed online, and then display the ranking of active cuffs in terms of worst vitals at the top.

Subsystem3: User Device - For the finished product, have the cuff information collated on a screen that ranks the active cuffs in terms of worst vitals at the top.

Subsystem4: Local wireless communication - For the finished product, remove the wifi component of the blood pressure cuff and replace it with an alternative frequency communication to communicate with the user device without the presence of wifi or cellular reception.

Criterion for Success:

Basic implementation: Automated blood pressure cuff with blood pressure, heart rate, and temperature readings processed using IoT. Handle multiple uses of the cuff, establish priority system based off of condition (shock index, rate of vitals dropping).

Complete implementation: The above with IoT functionality replaced with local wireless capability, and a device to display that data for the user.

Environmental Sensing for Firefighters

Andri Teneqexhi, Lauren White, Hyun Yi

Environmental Sensing for Firefighters

Featured Project

Hyun Yi, Lauren White, and Andri Teneqexhi earned the Instructor's Award in the Fall of 2013 for their work on the Environmental Sensing for Firefighters.

"Engineering is all about solving real life problems and using the solutions to improve the lives of others. ECE 445 allows you to actually delve deeper into what this really means by providing students the chance to undergo the engineering design process. This requires taking all of the theoretical knowledge, lab experiences, and ultimately, everything that you have ever learned in life, and applying it to your project. Though, there is structure to the course and deadlines in place to measure your team's progress, the actual design, implementation, and success of your project is all determined by you. Unlike any other course that I have taken, I've gained an appreciation for the utilization and benefits of external resources, unforeseen scheduling delays, delegating tasks, and most importantly, teamwork. I consider ECE 445 to be a crash course into real life engineering and a guide to become a successful engineer." -- Lauren White