Project

# Title Team Members TA Documents Sponsor
52 Carney Confocal Microscopy
Hyunjae Cho
Sung Hun Kim
Ye Hyun Kim
Luke Wendt design_document0.docx
final_paper0.pdf
presentation0.pptx
proposal0.pdf
Problem: Confocal Microscopy is an optical imaging technique for obtaining high resolution of mostly used in biological science. Confocal microscope uses point illumination method and discards any other stray light. Conventionally, to measure different points of sample, we had to change the angle of the light, so that it can measure different points of sample. This method may cause inaccuracy in imaging the object, since if the angle is slightly off, the light may not transmit through the pinhole, and cannot detect the image properly. In an attempt to resolve these drawbacks, we will be using 4 piezos to control the glass side. Using this method will not require changing the angle of the light anymore.

Solution: Below the glass slides, we will insert 4 piezos to control the Z-axis. In this way, we can control the height, and by controlling individual piezos, we can also tilt the glass slides. In order to function this way, we need to use a microcontroller unit, and control the piezeos. Afterwards, we need to program the device using C-language, so that the glass slide can move in Z-axis. Before implementing into the confocal microscope, we will test whether the piezos perform properly by verifying the positions. Since we are working in a nanometer scale, we need a light source and a photo-detector, and measure the speed taken. In this way, we can measure the distance moved, and confirm whether the glass slide has moved as we have expected.

Challenge: This project requires measuring in nanometer scale, which is not really visible to human eyes. Consequently, we would need to work on using light source and photo-detector, which requires the usage of programming. Although we have not explicitly learned to program the microcontroller unit, we can analyze the datasheet. Also, we would need a very sensitive photo-detector to measure the speed taken.

Ye Hyun Kim (ykim102)

Sung Hun Kim (skim113)

Hyunjae Cho (cho135)

Low Cost Myoelectric Prosthetic Hand

Michael Fatina, Jonathan Pan-Doh, Edward Wu

Low Cost Myoelectric Prosthetic Hand

Featured Project

According to the WHO, 80% of amputees are in developing nations, and less than 3% of that 80% have access to rehabilitative care. In a study by Heidi Witteveen, “the lack of sensory feedback was indicated as one of the major factors of prosthesis abandonment.” A low cost myoelectric prosthetic hand interfaced with a sensory substitution system returns functionality, increases the availability to amputees, and provides users with sensory feedback.

We will work with Aadeel Akhtar to develop a new iteration of his open source, low cost, myoelectric prosthetic hand. The current revision uses eight EMG channels, with sensors placed on the residual limb. A microcontroller communicates with an ADC, runs a classifier to determine the user’s type of grip, and controls motors in the hand achieving desired grips at predetermined velocities.

As requested by Aadeel, the socket and hand will operate independently using separate microcontrollers and interface with each other, providing modularity and customizability. The microcontroller in the socket will interface with the ADC and run the grip classifier, which will be expanded so finger velocities correspond to the amplitude of the user’s muscle activity. The hand microcontroller controls the motors and receives grip and velocity commands. Contact reflexes will be added via pressure sensors in fingertips, adjusting grip strength and velocity. The hand microcontroller will interface with existing sensory substitution systems using the pressure sensors. A PCB with a custom motor controller will fit inside the palm of the hand, and interface with the hand microcontroller.

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