Project

# Title Team Members TA Documents Sponsor
1 Smart Sprinkler Robot System
Area Award: Conservation
Denis Kurtovic
Jose Orozco
Kevin Johnson
appendix0.pdf
design_document0.pdf
final_paper0.pdf
presentation0.presentation
proposal0.pdf

Our project goal was to make a robotic sprinkler system that can detect soil moisture content and check online weather forecasts to determine whether the ground needs to be watered. After completing our product, we were able to meet all of our requirements.



The two main parts of this design are the sprinkler robot and the base station. The base station checks the weather forecast to determine if the chance of precipitation is low enough to warrant watering for the day. If the chance of rain is high enough, then the robot will not be deployed; otherwise, it will send the robot out to measure the soil moisture at specific points on the lawn. The sprinkler robot measures the soil moisture by deploying a two-point-probe into the ground to measure resistance. This data is then sent wirelessly to the base station where it determines whether or not to water that area. If it is determined the area needs watering, then the robot will turn on its sprinkler system and water the area until the base station tells it to stop. After that, the robot moves on to the next area that the base station tells it to go to. When the robot is finished, it returns to the base station.



This product is commercially viable because it is a smart watering system that does not require the installation of multiple expensive pipes and probes. It both reduces the water waste of a traditional sprinkler system while still allowing for it to be transported to a new location.



This project was sponsored by MIT Lincoln Laboratory.

Wireless IntraNetwork

Daniel Gardner, Jeeth Suresh

Wireless IntraNetwork

Featured Project

There is a drastic lack of networking infrastructure in unstable or remote areas, where businesses don’t think they can reliably recoup the large initial cost of construction. Our goal is to bring the internet to these areas. We will use a network of extremely affordable (<$20, made possible by IoT technology) solar-powered nodes that communicate via Wi-Fi with one another and personal devices, donated through organizations such as OLPC, creating an intranet. Each node covers an area approximately 600-800ft in every direction with 4MB/s access and 16GB of cached data, saving valuable bandwidth. Internal communication applications will be provided, minimizing expensive and slow global internet connections. Several solutions exist, but all have failed due to costs of over $200/node or the lack of networking capability.

To connect to the internet at large, a more powerful “server” may be added. This server hooks into the network like other nodes, but contains a cellular connection to connect to the global internet. Any device on the network will be able to access the web via the server’s connection, effectively spreading the cost of a single cellular data plan (which is too expensive for individuals in rural areas). The server also contains a continually-updated several-terabyte cache of educational data and programs, such as Wikipedia and Project Gutenberg. This data gives students and educators high-speed access to resources. Working in harmony, these two components foster economic growth and education, while significantly reducing the costs of adding future infrastructure.