Fall 2018
A

Analog Signals: An analog signal exists throughout a continuous interval of time and/or takes on a continuous range of values.

B

Batteries: A battery is a limited source of energy. This energy is stored in chemical form is readily available for conversion into electrical energy.

Bias: A bias (or bias voltage) is the voltage needed by device for proper function. Two examples include (1) the common-emitter BJT configuration where VCC and RC provide a bias voltage to the collector that allows for the typical set of IV responses provided in the datasheets and (2) an electret condenser microphone that requires a a resistor (typically around 1-10 kOhm) to tie the drain of an internal JFET preamp to a voltage source (typically 3-9 V).

Bipolar Junction Transistor (BJT): A semiconductor device that serves as an electrical switch or amplifier.

C

Circuits: A circuit is an arrangement of connected elements through which current can flow.

Capacitors: A capacitor can store electrical potential energy. They can collect and release charge very quickly.

Compression: The removal of non-essential elements from data to distill it down to critical information.

Current: A current is a rate of flow of charge.

Current Divider Rule (VDR): The largest current is through the smallest resistance in parallel.

D

Digital Signals: A digital signal is a sequence of discrete symbols.

Diode: Diodes allow current flow in one direction but not the other.

E

Electric Charge: Opposite charges attract and like charges repel.

Energy: A property of objects whose quantity is a limitation on the capactity to do work.

F

Fourier Series: Any practical periodic voltage signal can be represented as a sum of sinusoids.

G

Graphs: Graphs should have a title or caption and properly labeled axes.

H

Huffman: David A. Huffman was an electrical engineering and a pioneer of computer science who remains well-known for his 1952 paper describing a sometimes-optimal compression algorithm. Explore More! at Wikipedia.org.

I

I-V (Current-Voltage) Characteristics
J

K

Kirchhoff's Voltage Law (KVL)

Kirchhoff's Current Law (KCL)

L

Logic
Digital Logic

CMOS Logic Circuits

Combining (CMOS) Logic Circuits

Improperly constructed Logic Circuits

M

MOSFET
N

Nodal Circuit Analysis

Noise

Norton Theorem: Any black box subcircuit containing exclusively sources and resistors is equivalent to a subcircuit containing a current source in parallel with a resistor.

Nyquist Sampling Rate

O

Ohm's Law

P

Parallel Resistors

Photodiodes

Photons

Photovoltaic Effect

Power Consumption

Power
Energy Conversion

Electrical Power

Power Balance

Power at a Resistor

Ideal Sources

Q

Quantization

R

Resistors

...Resistor Bridge Circuits

S

Sampling

Series Resistors

Significant Digits

Fourier Series

Standard Labeling

Solar Power

T

Tables of Data

Thévenin Theorem

...Applied to Known Subcircuits

I-V Characteristics of...

U

Units

Unit Conversion

V

Voltage

...Node Voltages

Voltage Divider Rule (VDR): The largest voltage drop is across the largest resistance in series.

W

Electrical Waveforms

Average and RMS

PWM Waveforms

Sinusoidal Waveforms

Wires

X

Y

Z